An Introduction to the Comparative Grammar of the Semitic by Sabatino Moscati, Wolfram Von Soden, Anton Spitaler,

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By Sabatino Moscati, Wolfram Von Soden, Anton Spitaler, Professor Emeritus of Semitic Languages and of Ethiopian Studies Edward Ullendorff

An creation to the Comparative Grammar of the Semitic Languages

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Additional info for An Introduction to the Comparative Grammar of the Semitic Languages: Phonology and Morphology (Porta Linguarum Orientalium)

Example text

S. In Akkadian, so far as our limited evidence permits.. a reconstruction, the position of the stress may be expressed as follows: a) if the final syllable is the result of contraction it generally bears the stress; b) otherwise stress does not fall on the ultima, even if it is long, but recedes as far as possible until it meets a long syllable (if there is no long syllable stress comes to rest on the first syllable of the word). Only in rare instances (cf. von Soden, GAG, p. 38) does stress fall on a short syllable in the middle of a word.

Preliminaries 1. 1. g. ktb "to write", qbr "to bury", qrb "to approach", etc. These roots (root morphemes) constitute a fundamental category of lexical morphemes (cf. 564-68). The linguistic reality of consonantal roots is shown not only by their lexical implications but also by the laws governing the compatibility or otherwise of radicals (which do not concern the vowels: cf. 10) and in the transcription of foreign words. Only the pronouns and some particles lie outside this system of roots. 2.

Ar. *'aywam "days" > 'ayyam. g. Akk. *yakSud "he conquered" > *yiksud > ikSud (total progressive assimilation). g. /aaa~ for Yi§lyiiq (and cf. later on Syr. '/sl}aq). 8. g. Ar. *kawy "burning" > kayy. g. Akk. *iwbil "he carried" > ubil (reciprocal assimilation), *baytu "house" > bitu (total regressive assimilation). Of. 97-104. 2. 9. 10. g. Ar. g. Ar. layl "night", lUn "to spend the night" (Heb. lUn, lin, Ug. g. Akk. g. g. Sem. *sams "sun" > Ar. *sams (n > sams, cf. Akk. samsu, Ug. sps. 11. g. *wawaqi "ounces" > 'awaqi (regressive and at distance).

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