The Political History of Tudor and Stuart England: A by Victor Stater

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By Victor Stater

A Political heritage of Tudor and Stuart England attracts jointly a desirable collection of resources to light up this turbulent period of English background. From the bloody overthrow of Richard III in 1485, to the construction of a global imperial country lower than Queen Anne, those resources illustrate England's tough transition from the medieval to the modern.Covering a interval characterized by way of clash and department, this wide-ranging single-volume assortment provides the bills of Yorkists and Lancastrians, Protestants and Catholics, and Roundheads and Cavaliers part by means of part. A Political background of Tudor and Stuart England presents a very important chance for college students to ascertain the associations and occasions that moulded English historical past within the early smooth period at first-hand.

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Distinction between public and private service was never clear; the king’s servants were his, not the state’s, though they might perform the duties of a bureaucrat. These letters give some idea of the nature of the king’s government in the reign of Henry VIII. Gaining a foothold in the royal service depended upon the cultivation of personal ties. Patrons found posts for clients, who in turn magnified the importance of their benefactors, giving them eyes and ears in the bureaucracy. Henry VIII, though at times a conscientious monarch, was neither willing nor able to carry out every function of his government, and he usually relied upon ‘men of business’ to shoulder much of the administrative burden.

Its powers derived from the king’s responsibility to provide order and justice for his subjects, and, unlike the common law courts, no precedents bound it. It evolved from the medieval council, which had always had a judicial function, but by the late fifteenth-century the court began to take on a separate existence. A 1487 Act of Parliament gave form to the new court, granting it subpoena powers and reinforcing its jurisdiction over a variety of causes, most importantly offences connected with disorder: riot and affray.

STAR CHAMBER UNDER HENRY VII Star Chamber was the premier prerogative court. Its powers derived from the king’s responsibility to provide order and justice for his subjects, and, unlike the common law courts, no precedents bound it. It evolved from the medieval council, which had always had a judicial function, but by the late fifteenth-century the court began to take on a separate existence. A 1487 Act of Parliament gave form to the new court, granting it subpoena powers and reinforcing its jurisdiction over a variety of causes, most importantly offences connected with disorder: riot and affray.

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